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What Are the Different Face Shapes?

There are five kinds of face shapes : round, oval, square, oblong,triangular. Different face shape has different character and is suitable different hair style, glasses even cloth neckline. Now let’s look at the difference between them. Round.  This face shaped face is suitable for wearing rectangular eye glass frames. The frameless eye glass is perfect for  Full Article…

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What is Fetal Circulation(1)?

Diffusion across the placenta rather than the fetal lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract supplies all of the respiratory, excretory, and nutritional needs of the fetus. Fetal circulation is adaptive to these conditions. The circulation of blood via a fetus is by necessity distinguished from blood circulation in a newborn. Respiration, the procurement of nutrients, and  Full Article…

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What is Hepatic Portal System?

A portal system is a pattern of circulation in which the vessels that drain one group of capillaries transport blood to a second group of capillaries, which in turn are drained by more common systemic veins that take blood to the right atrium of the heart. Therefore, there are two capillary beds in series. The  Full Article…

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What is Congenital Dislocation of the Hip?

It is significant for early detection of the lax hip at birth. The reason is that with a high expectancy of a normal hip as the outcome, it allows a relatively easy and safe treatment protocol. Progressively urgent dysplasia of both the acetabulum and the femoral head result from delay in diagnosis. On the other hand,  the  Full Article…

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What are Veins of the Abdominal Region?

The largest vessel in the body in diameter is the inferior vena cava, which is produced by the union of the two normal iliac veins that drain the lower extremities. While the inferior vena cava ascends via the abdominal cavity to penetrate the diaphragm and enter the right atrium, it parallels the abdominal aorta on  Full Article…

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What are Veins of the Lower Limb?

Being similar with the upper limbs, the lower limbs have both a deep and a superficial group of veins. The deep veins have more valves than do the superficial veins, and they accompany corresponding arteries. Then first we’ll describe the deep veins. The origin of the posterior and anterior tibial veins is in the foot,  Full Article…

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What are Veins of the Upper Limb?

Both deep and superficial venous drainage is owned by the upper limb. The deep veins accompany the arteries of the same area and are similarly named. Both the ulnar vein on the medial side drain blood and the radial vein on the lateral side of the forearm from the palmar arch of the hand. The  Full Article…

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What are Arteries of the Pelvis and Lower Limb(2)?

Several vessels arise from the femoral to provide the thigh region. The deep femoral artery is the largest of these, which passes posteriorly to supply the hamstring muscles. The proximal end of the femur is surrounded by the lateral and medial femoral circumflex arteries, by which muscles are provided in this region. While the femoral  Full Article…

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What are Arteries of the Pelvis and Lower Limb(1)?

While the abdominal aorta splits into the right and left common iliac arteries, it brings to an end in the lower pelvic area. On their respective sides, these vessels pass downward approximately 5 cm, and they terminate while they separate into the the external and internal iliac arteries. Extensive branches are owned by the internal  Full Article…

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What are Branches of the Aorta?

While the thoracic aorta descends through the thoracic cavity to the diaphragm, it is a continuation of the aortic arch. Branches are given off by this large vessel to the organs and muscles of the thoracic region. The anterior intercostal arteries which provide blood to the intercostal muscles, and the phrenic arteries which provide the  Full Article…

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What are Arteries of the Neck and Head?

The normal carotid arteries course upward in the neck along both sides of the trachea. Each normal carotid artery branches into the internal and external carotid arteries slightly below the angle of the mandible. A slight dilation named the carotid sinus is at the base of the internal carotid artery. Baroreceptors , which monitor blood  Full Article…

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What is Aortic Arch?

Aorta, from which all the basic arteries of the body arise, is the main systemic artery. Ascending from the left ventricle of the heart, the systemic vessel is named the ascending aorta. The left and right coronary arteries, by which the myocardium of the heart is provided, are arising from the ascending aorta. The arches  Full Article…

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What are Problems in Diabetic Control?

Poor control and so-called brittle diabetes with recurrent ketoacidosis and hypoglycaemia may result from some causes. Diabetes and growth. In spite of comparison between identical twins discordant for diabetes expresses many loss of final height, children with diabetes can hope a normal adult stature. Modest pubertal put off is more frequent. What is more, marked  Full Article…

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What are Arteries and Veins?

Arteries When the pressure of the blood rises as a result of systole, large arteries, such as the aorta, expand. When the blood pressure falls during diastole, they recoil just like a stretched rubber band. A smoother flow of blood via the smaller arteries and still smaller arterioles is produced by the aid of this  Full Article…

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What are Blood Vessels?

A closed tubular network, which allows blood to flow from the heart to all the living cells of the body and then back to the heart, is produced by blood vessels. Passing through vessels of progressively smaller diameters, blood leaves the heart that is referred to as arteries, arterioles, and capillaries. Venules and veins are  Full Article…

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What are Principal Aspects of an Electrocardiogram (ECG)?

P wave Formed by stimulation of the SA node, the P wave is a small upward deflection that accompanies depolarization of the atrial fibers. The wave is followed by the actual contraction of the atria by a fraction of a second. During the expression of the P wave, the ventricles of the heart are in  Full Article…

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What is Pacemaker Potential?

There is a spontaneous depolarization of the SA node named the pacemaker potential during diastole, however, the cells of the SA node do not keep a resting membrane potential in the same manner as resting neurons. Starting at nearly -60 mV, the membrane potential gradually depolarizes to -40 mV. It is the threshold for forming  Full Article…

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Colloid and Lipoproteins are Two Types of the Fetal Thyroid, and a History of Thyroid

The thyroid results from a central extension of the endoderm foregut , which transmits caudad to locate at the level of the upper traches. According to developmental failures, it can be divided into maldescent or  hypoplasia. Hypoplasia differences from absence of detectable thyroid and early dangerous hypothyroidism. It is to lesser degrees so that maintain asymptomatic till  Full Article…

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What are Chambers and Valves(3)?

Positioned at the base of the ascending aorta is the aortic semilunar valve when it leaves the left ventricle. When the left ventricle contracts, the aortic semilunar valve opens, and it closes as a result of the arterial pressure of the blood when the left ventricle relaxes. Therefore, this valve prevents the backflow of blood  Full Article…

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What are Chambers and Valves(2)?

The right ventricle is filled by the blood from the right atrium, passing through the tricuspid valve. The tricuspid valve gets its name from its 3 valve cusps, which is an AV valve. Strong tendinous cords named chordae tendineae help the cusps of the AV valve hold in position. By cone-shaped papillary muscles, the chordae  Full Article…

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